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Experiences In The D | The Blog for Visit Detroit

The Visit Detroit Blog is part of The Detroit Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau (DMCVB).

Dequindre Cut Expansion Lets You Explore More

Posted on Tuesday, June 07 2016 in Outdoors
DequindreBike Bowen
 
If you’re a biker or a runner, or just looking for a new way to explore the city by foot, you need to check out the Dequindre Cut.
 
 
Formerly a Grand Trunk Railroad line, the Cut is an urban recreational path that runs from the Detroit riverfront to Eastern Market. A recent half-mile expansion extended the pathway to Mack Avenue at ground level, linking it to the cultural institutions of Midtown and beyond to Hamtramck via walking and biking paths.
 
What to do along the Dequindre Cut
 
For starters, the Cut is a great place to get fit. It features a 20-foot-wide paved pathway, which includes separate lanes for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. Entrance ramps are located at Lafayette Street, at Gratiot Avenue and at Woodbridge Street.
 
So take a walk. Go for a run. Ride your bike — or rent one from Wheelhouse Detroit. They’re available daily at the shop’s riverfront location or in Eastern Market on Wilkins Street every Friday, Saturday and Sunday.
 
Each Tuesday there’s also a free fit camp from 6 to 7 p.m. where Woodbridge and St. Aubin streets meet. All you need is a yoga mat and to RSVP in advance.
 
The pathway is also well known for its urban artwork and graffiti, including the 15-by-100-foot Nature’s Wrath by Malt. To make it even more artsy, now through July, high-quality reproductions of masterpieces can be seen alongside the urban art — as well as in locations across the metro area — through the Detroit Institute of Arts’ Inside|Out program.
 
And be sure to mark your calendar for the Soiree on the Greenway on Aug. 18. This garden party on the Cut will feature local art, food trucks and live entertainment.
 
There’s always something to discover along the Dequindre Cut.
 
 
What’s your favorite spot along the path?
 
 
By: Lori Bremerkamp
 
Photo credit: Bill Bowen